Side Effects of ashwagandha

Nov 27, 2022

Ashwagandha is an evergreen shrub that grows in India, the Middle East, and parts of Africa.

 


The bark and leaves of the ashwagandha plant are used to make medicine. Ashwagandha is sometimes called Indian ginseng because it has many of the same effects as ginseng.

Ashwagandha has a long history of use as a general tonic and "adaptogen," a substance that helps the body deal with physical and emotional stress.

Today, ashwagandha is used as an "adaptogen" for anxiety, stress, and low energy levels. It is also used for diabetes, arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, backache, fibromyalgia, menstrual cramps, trouble sleeping (insomnia), tumors, tuberculosis, leprosy, anemia, hiccups , Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), balance in bipolar disorder treatment , constipation , and to counteract sexual side effects of prescription drugs such as finasteride (Propecia) and flutamide (Eulexin).

 

The roots and leaves of the ashwagandha plant are used to make medicine.

 


Ashwagandha is most commonly taken orally as a powder, tablet, or liquid extract. When taken by mouth: Ashwagandha is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken for up to 3 months.Side effects might include stomach upset and diarrhea, especially with large doses.

Special Precautions & Warnings:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn’t enough reliable information to know if ashwagandha is safe to use when pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Autoimmune disorders: Ashwagandha might worsen autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or Graves’ disease. If you have one of these conditions, it’s best to avoid using ashwagandha.

 

Ashwagandha is used for arthritis, anxiety, trouble sleeping (insomnia), tummy trouble, and to boost the immune system.

 



Ashwagandha is a small woody shrub that grows in India, the Middle East, and Africa. The root and berry of the ashwagandha plant are used to make medicine. Ashwagandha is used for arthritis, anxiety, trouble sleeping (insomnia), tummy trouble, and to boost the immune system. It is also used as an "adaptogen" to help the body cope with daily stress, and as a general tonic for overall health.


Some people apply ashwagandha directly to the skin for joint pain (rheumatism), wound healing, and insect bites.

 

Some people apply ashwagandha directly to the skin for joint pain and skin conditions.

 


It is not clear how ashwagandha works. Some people apply ashwagandha directly to the skin for joint pain and skin conditions.

Ashwagandha is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth short-term. The long-term safety of ashwagandha is not known. Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking ashwagandha if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: Ashwagandha might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using ashwagandha at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery

 

Ashwagandha is possibly safe when taken by mouth for up to 3 months.

 

Long-term safety is unknown. Ashwagandha has been used in ancient Indian medicine (Ayurveda). Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

 

Ashwagandha can cause some side effects including stomach upset, diarrhea, and vomiting. It can also cause drowsiness. Do not take ashwagandha if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

 


Ashwagandha is a plant native to India. The roots and berries of the plant are used to make medicine. Ashwagandha has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries. It is sometimes called "Indian ginseng" because it has many of the same properties as ginseng.

Ashwagandha is most commonly used for stress. It is also used for a wide range of other conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, anxiety, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), balance, bipolar disorder, brain function, cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), colitis, depression, diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, inflammation, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), joint pain, leprosy, low sex drive, multiple sclerosis (MS), parkinsonism , pneumonia ,hot flashes associated with menopause , rheumatoid arthritis (RA), schizophrenia , Sjogren's syndrome , skin conditions such as psoriasis and eczema , ulcerative colitis , urinary tract infections and tuberculosis .

When taken by mouth: Ashwagandha is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth short-term. Some people who take ashwagandha have stomach upset or diarrhea . Ashwagandha can cause vomiting . It might also cause drowsiness in some people. When applied to the skin : Ashwagandha is POSSIBLY SAFE when applied to the skin appropriately for up to 30 days .
Special Precautions & Warnings: Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if ashwagandha is safe to use when pregnant or breast - feeding . Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

 

Ashwagandha is an "adaptogen." This means it can help the body cope with physical or emotional stress.

 




Ashwagandha is an "adaptogen." This means it can help the body cope with physical or emotional stress. Ashwagandha is thought to work by reducing levels of the stress hormone cortisol. cortisol can have many negative effects on the body, such as increasing blood sugar levels and promoting fat storage. Therefore, by reducing cortisol levels, ashwagandha may help to protect the body against some of the negative effects of stress.

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